Home  > Info Center  > FAQs  >  Do I always need a charge controller?
Do I always need a charge controller?
2018-04-04

Not always, but usually. Generally, there is no need for a charge controller with the small maintenance, or trickle charge panels, such as the 1 to 5-watt panels. A rough rule is that if the panel outputs about 2 watts or less for each 50 battery amp-hours, then you don't need one.

For example, a standard flooded golf car battery is around 210 amp-hours. So to keep up a series pair of them (12 volts) just for maintenance or storage, you would want a panel that is around 4.2 watts. The popular 5-watt panels are close enough, and will not need a controller. If you are maintaining AGM deep cycle batteries, such as the Concorde Sun Extender then you can use a smaller 2 to 2-watt panel.

Charger Controller Types

Charge controllers coming in all shapes, sizes, features, and price ranges. They range from the small 4.5 amp (Sunguard) controllers, up to the 60 to 80 amp MPPT programmable controllers with computer interface. Often, if currents over 60 amps are required, two or more 40 to 80 amp units are wired in parallel. The most common controllers used for all battery based systems are in the 4 to 60 amp range, but some of the new MPPT controllers such as the Outback Power FlexMax go up to 80 amps.

CHARGE CONTROLS COME IN 3 GENERAL TYPES (WITH SOME OVERLAP):

Simple 1 or 2 stage controllers which rely on relays or shunt transistors to control the voltage in one or two steps. These steps essentially just short circuit or disconnect the solar panel when a certain voltage is reached. For all practical purposes these are dinosaurs, but you still see a few on old systems - and some of the super cheap ones for sale on the internet. Their only real claim to fame is their reliability - they have so few components, there is not much to break.

3-stage and/or PWM such Morning star, Xantrex, Blue Sky, Steca, and many others. These are pretty much the industry standard now, but you will occasionally still see some of the older shunt/relay types around, such as in the very cheap systems offered by discounters and mass marketers.

Maximum power point tracking (MPPT), such as those made by Midnite Solar, Xantrex, Outback Power, Morningstar and others. These are the ultimate in controllers, with prices to match - but with efficiencies in the 94% to 98% range, they can save considerable money on larger systems since they provide 10 to 30% more power to the battery. For more information, see our  article on MPPT.

Most controllers come with some kind of indicator, either a simple LED, a series of LED's, or digital meters. Many newer ones, such as the Outback Power, Midnite Classic, Morningstar MPPT, and others now have built in computer interfaces for monitoring and control.  The simplest usually have only a couple of small LED lamps, which show that you have power and that you are getting some kind of charge. Most of those with meters will show both voltage and the current coming from the panels and the battery voltage. Some also show how much current is being pulled from the LOAD terminals.

All of the charge controllers that we stock are 3 stage PWM types, and the MPPT units. (in reality, "4-stage" is somewhat advertising hype - it used to be called equalize, but someone decided that 4 stage was better than 3). And now we even see one that is advertised as "5-stage"...




Contact